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Monthly Archives: February 2014

Y Bont Gyswllt by Gwenda Williams

Influenced by architecture and local history, this quilt was designed on Menai Suspension Bridge, built and opened to the public on 30th January 1826 by Thomas Telford, which replaced a treacherous ferry journey from Bangor, North Wales, across the tidal straits to the Isle of Anglesey.

It was just one of the many challenges faced by Telford in improving the London to Holyhead road, essential for crossing to Ireland. Many boats were capsized or ran aground before the bridge was built. Telford proposed a suspension bridge far larger than any previously built, to allow tall sailing ships to continue along the straits.

This bridge today is one of the many wonders of Wales.

Made using photos bonded onto fabric, pained and dyed. Organzas and other man-made fabrics stitched to give texture and burned.

Y Bont Gyswllt by Gwenda Williams

Y Bont Gyswllt by Gwenda Williams

This quilt is part of the Connection touring exhibition by Cwilt Cymru currently showing at Forge Mill Needle Museum in Redditch.

Gwenllïan by Bethan M. Hughes

The only child of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, ‘y Llyw Olaf’, the last true prince of Wales, Gwenllïan was born in Abergwyngregyn, Gwynedd in 1282. Her mother died in childbirth and her father was murdered by English mercenaries six months later. On the orders of the English king, Edward I, she was taken ‘in her cradle’ to Sempringham, Lincolnshire and incarcerated in a nunnery for the rest of her life. She was denied her family, her language, her landscape, her lineage, her heritage; and was prevented from having her own children so that there would be no heirs to the Welsh royal line.

She had no connection, the lines of her lineage were severed, and the memory of her almost wiped out. She is named in only a handful of historical records and her story was almost unknown even in Wales until recent times. Thanks to the efforts of those who sought to restore her name and her memory, she now has a mountain named for her (Carnedd Gwenllïan), there is a society in her name, her birth date is noted, and a memorial stone stands on the site of Sempringham Abbey.

Gwenllian by Bethan M Hughes

Gwenllian by Bethan M Hughes

The quilt features text from two of the rare historical records which name Gwenllïan – the Annales Cambriae (in Latin) and Robert Manning’s English Chronicle (in Middle English). It also includes a contemporary poem by Mererid Hopwood, Yn Sempringham, used with the poet’s permission.

The black and white of a nun’s habit sit alongside the symbolic red of Wales. The horizontal and vertical lines of a family tree are severed, scribbled out and show no connections. The flat low-lying landscape of Sempringham is reflected in the horizontal piecing and quilting – Gwenllïan was denied the mountains and coast of Gwynedd. The oak leaves refer to the elegy to Llywelyn by Gruffudd ab yr Ynad Coch, in which he fears that, with the prince’s death, the world is at an end, as the stars fall from the skies and the oak trees crash together

Poni welwch chi hynt y gwynt a’r glaw? Poni welwch chi’r deri’n ymdaraw?

Cotton, applied and screen-printed ink, free piecing, applique and free-motion machine quilting

(Photo: Dewi Tanat Lloyd)

This quilt is part of the Connection touring exhibition by Cwilt Cymru currently showing at Forge Mill Needle Museum in Redditch.

Cwilt Cymru’s brand new exhibition, Connection, opened today February 11th at the Forge Mill Needle Museum in Redditch. It will run until March 9th. Thank to Jo-Anne at the Museum for hanging the quilts and to Judy Fairless for taking these photos in the gallery. To see more photos and information about Connection click on the Exhibitions button above.

Cwilt Cymru’s brand new exhibition, Connection, will open at the Forge Mill Needle Museum in Redditch on February 11th.

Cwilt Cymru’s current members and four guest artists have each created two new pieces. Each maker has explored her own interpretation of the theme of Connection: family experiences, history, language, industry, landscape and the natural world. This is a diverse and fascinating exhibition which begins its tour at the Forge Mill. It will also feature in the Turning Twenty summer exhibition by the Quilt Association at the Minerva Arts Centre in Llanidloes from July-September.

Follow this blog to see the quilts and to read about their inspiration as we post pictures over the next few weeks. Here’s a sneak preview of four quilts:

Processional Way by Judith Barker

Processional Way by Judith Barker

Mon Mam Cymru by Gwenda Williams

Mon Mam Cymru by Gwenda Williams
Macclesfield 1 by Judy Fairless

Macclesfield 1 by Judy Fairless

Holding it Together 1 by Judy Stephens

Holding it Together 1 by Judy Stephens